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Garden Grove Eye Clinic – Is a Blinding Eye Disease Hiding?

Vision loss can occur with early signs only an eye doctor can see

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a comprehensive eye exam, pediatric eye exam and contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, or dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you? Our Garden Grove eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

During the very early stages of many eye diseases, most people never notice a problem. For example, when age-related macular degeneration (AMD) first appears, blind spots can develop that people don’t see because their brain is compensating. But while the individual with AMD may not be aware of the disease, an eye doctor will detect it during a comprehensive eye exam. That’s why the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) strongly recommends people over age 40 to protect themselves from vision loss by visiting an eye clinic regularly for dilated eye exams.

How common is age-related macular degeneration?

Estimates report that more than 2 million Americans live with the most progressive forms of AMD, and this number is expected to rise to 4.4 million people by 2050. Age-related macular degeneration is the top cause of blindness among white Americans who are older than 40, and it’s one of the most common reasons for permanent vision loss in the world.

What is AMD?

This eye disease occurs when your macula, a part of the retina, is damaged. The macula is responsible for giving you a crisp, clear vision in the center of your field of view. A loss of central vision has far-reaching effects on your life, hampering your ability to read, drive, and see faces.

How often do I need to visit an eye care professional?

According to the AAO, adults with no signs or risk factors for ocular disease are advised to start with regular eye exams from age 40. Then, until age 54, guidelines recommend visiting an eye clinic every two to four years; between age 55-64, you should see your eye doctor every one to three years. By the time you are 65, annual eye exams are encouraged – even if you don’t experience any visual or eye symptoms. Of course, if you have additional risk factors for eye disease, your eye doctor may instruct you to visit more frequently.

Can vision loss from AMD be prevented?

Nowadays, eye doctors have even more technologies to diagnose age-related macular degeneration as early as possible – as long as you are vigilant about visiting your eye clinic for eye exams! Why are all these eye exams so important? Because the earlier AMD is detected and treated; the more effective treatment can be.

Possible treatments to help prevent vision loss from age-related macular degeneration include:

  • Injections of drugs to stop new blood vessels from forming and to block leaking from unhealthy blood vessels (symptoms characteristic of wet AMD)
  • Laser therapy to destroy abnormal blood vessels that are actively growing
  • Photodynamic laser therapy that causes damage to abnormal blood vessels
  • Taking vitamins as eye health supplements

Don’t let your brain fool you into thinking your vision is fine! Instead, let an eye doctor make that decision. In the year 2020, you couldn’t pick a better time to focus on your eyes. Contact an eye care center near you to book an eye exam today.

Call Garden Grove Optometry today to make an appointment: 714-500-7577 or alternatively you can book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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Garden Grove Eye Clinic – How to Improve Your Vision

Garden Grove Optometry Our eye doctor in Garden Grove, California explains

Your eyes give you so much, isn’t it time to give back?

In the US, it’s been estimated that 12 million people over the age of 40 have some type of vision impairment! Yet, while the numbers are overwhelming, it doesn’t mean poor eyesight is simply inevitable as you age. In addition to taking advantage of our expert eye care services, our eye doctor shares 7 ways to improve and protect your eyes against problems.

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a comprehensive eye exam, pediatric eye exam and contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, or dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you? Our Garden Grove eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

Eat a nutritious diet

Eating heart-healthy foods also helps to protect your vision. That means following a diet with minimal saturated fats and salt, a moderate amount of lean proteins (legumes and nuts are great options), whole grains, and plenty of fresh fruits and veggies. In particular, antioxidant-rich foods, such as strawberries, walnuts, and dark leafy greens, can help decrease your chances of developing cataracts and macular degeneration.

Visit your eye doctor for eye exams

A comprehensive eye exam can pick up on problems you may not have noticed, because many eye diseases don’t present symptoms at the early stages. That’s why regular eye exams by an eye care professional (not the same as basic vision screening done at your local pharmacy!) are critical, even if you have no vision complaints. Plus, as you age, it’s common for your vision to naturally change, and keeping your prescription up to date is a no-brainer keeping your vision clear.

Keep chronic health conditions stable

Many chronic health conditions, such as diabetes and high blood pressure, put you at higher risk for vision of complications. However, controlling your condition drastically reduces your chances of a problem. With diabetes, keeping blood sugars in the parameters recommended by your physician can help prevent diabetic retinopathy from developing and progressing. Controlling blood pressure also helps prevent retinal bleeding and swelling.

Quit smoking

While genetics may be the number one risk factor for age-related macular degeneration, smoking is the number two risk factor! Smoking is also linked to cataract progression. You may not be able to control the genes you inherit, but you can control whether or not you smoke.

Call Garden Grove Optometry today to make an appointment: 714-500-7577 or alternatively you can book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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Pink Eye Treatment Clinic Garden Grove

Local Pink Eye Treatment Clinic in Garden Grove, California

If you wake up and find your eyes sealed shut with crusty gunk, you probably have conjunctivitis, better known as pink eye. This type of eye infection can look and feel pretty nasty, but you’re in good company. It’s one of the most common eye conditions in the world, and it’s highly treatable. Contact your eye clinic as soon as possible to get treatment and relief from the icky symptoms.

Garden Grove Optometry Our eye doctor in Garden Grove, California explains

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a comprehensive eye exam, pediatric eye exam and contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, or dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you? Our Garden Grove eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

What is conjunctivitis?

Conjunctivitis is an inflammation of the thin, transparent membrane that lines the whites of your eyes and the inside of your eyelids. It can be caused by a variety of things, and your eye doctor will help figure out the cause in order to recommend the best treatment.

What causes pink eye, and what are the symptoms?

  • Viral infection a virus, such as the common cold, leads to viral conjunctivitis. This type of eye infection is highly contagious, but it also tends to clear up on its own within a few days. Most of the time it affects both eyes, and you may have a cough or runny nose along with it.
  • Bacterial infection a bacterial infection is to blame for bacterial conjunctivitis. This is the kind of pink eye that most often leads to yellow, crusty, and sticky discharge that builds up in the corner of your eye and along the lash line. When this discharge is severe, it can glue your eyelids together as you sleep. Typically, bacterial conjunctivitis starts in one eye and moves to the other.
  • Allergic reaction allergic conjunctivitis is caused by airborne eye irritants such as dust, pollen, and pet dander. It is often seasonal, although cases can flare up all year round. Even people who aren’t allergic to these substances may experience allergic conjunctivitis, just because the lining of the eye is easily irritated and can get inflamed.

How do eye doctors treat pink eye?

Treatment for conjunctivitis is largely dependent on which type of infection you have. Your eye doctor will perform an eye exam – paying close attention to your symptoms to determine if your pink eye is viral, bacterial, or allergic.

Like other viruses that you pick up, there’s no treatment for viral conjunctivitis; it just needs to run its course. You can apply warm compresses to help alleviate the uncomfortable symptoms. For bacterial conjunctivitis, your eye doctor will likely prescribe an antibiotic ointment or eye drops. The symptoms of allergic conjunctivitis may be diminished and relieved by allergy medications.

Should I stay home if I have conjunctivitis?

If you suspect you or your child has conjunctivitis, don’t rush off to work or send your kid to school! Instead, head to an eye clinic for an eye exam with an eye doctor near you as soon as possible. In the meantime, the golden rule is to practice good hygiene to avoid spreading your infection to family and friends.

Bacterial conjunctivitis is spread through direct contact with infected hands or any objects that made contact with your infected eye. Try not to touch others when you have pink eye, and do your best not to touch any shared items to your eye. If you have viral conjunctivitis, sneeze and cough into your elbow or a tissue.

No matter which type of pink eye you have, our eye doctor’s best advice is to wash your hands often! And even when you’re feeling better, follow your eye doctor’s advice about when you can be around others without the risk of spreading the infection.

Call Garden Grove Optometry today to make an appointment: 714-500-7577 or alternatively you can book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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Garden Grove Eye Clinic – 14 Eye Care Secrets

Why didn’t my eye doctor tell me?

How much do you really know about eye care? Here’s a rundown of how you should treat your eyes so you can enjoy clear, healthy vision for as long as possible.

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Garden Grove eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

1.Sunglasses offer more than style

Just like you slather on the sunscreen before a day outdoors, you also need to protect your eyes from dangerous UV rays. Putting on a pair of trendy sunglasses will give you more than a fabulous look, it will also help safeguard your eyes against damage. Wraparound frame designs are ideal.

2.Polarized sunglasses aren’t always best

When you shop your eye clinic for sunglasses, don’t automatically reach for the ones with polarized lenses. While they are exceptional for reducing glare, they can make it near impossible to read the LCD display on your navigation system or phone. Banking at an ATM also becomes challenging when wearing polarized sunglasses.

3.Carrots are not the ultimate eye-healthy food

We’re not out to debunk your mother’s wisdom, but to let you in on a secret – dark, leafy veggies like kale and spinach are just as good, if not better for your lasting eye health than carrots. But that doesn’t mean orange and yellow foods don’t have anything to offer. Carrots, pumpkin, and other sunshine colored foods are also rich in lutein and zeaxanthin, both of which help protect against age-related macular degeneration.

4.Eye make-up should smell fresh

Did you know bacteria can lurk and breed in your eye cosmetics? By using old make-up, you risk exposing your eyes to nasty germs that can lead to eye infections. Rule of thumb is to toss your eye cosmetics every three months. But if you can’t bring yourself to do that, sniff the product before applying. If it has a funky “off” smell, it’s possible bacteria have taken root.

5.Eye drops are better when chilled

To prevent your eyes from stinging when inserting eye drops, store them in the refrigerator.

6.OTC eye drops aren’t always safe

Before buying eye drops off the drugstore shelf, speak to your eye doctor! Even better, visit your eye clinic for an eye exam. If you have an infection, steroid drops can clear up the redness but worsen the infection. Your eye doctor will recommend the best type of eye drops for your condition.

7.Don’t be afraid of the dark

You may be surprised to hear that reading in dim light won’t damage your eyes. However, you may get a headache.

8.Eyeglasses need special care

Tissues and toilet paper aren’t made for cleaning your glasses. Think about it, paper is made from wood, which can scratch your lenses. Soft and silky microfiber cloths are best.

9.Smoking can affect your eyes

Everyone knows about the effects of smoking on the lungs and heart, but did you know smoking has also been linked with the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD)? Cigarette smokers are at a 4x greater risk of being blinded by AMD than non-smokers – and even more frightening is that the risk lasts for up to a decade after you quit smoking.

10.Over 60? Get LASIK after you have a cataract

If your insurance is paying for cataract removal surgery, your eye doctor can fix your vision at the same time. Also, if your finances make it hard to get cataracts removed as soon as they are diagnosed, waiting is rarely dangerous. Cataracts may blur your view, but generally they won’t hurt you.

11.Pink eye isn’t always harmless

Pink eye can be caused by various culprits, including bacteria and viruses. If you have pink eye as a result of a bacterial infection, you need antibiotic treatment. Leaving it untreated can lead to lasting problems, such as light sensitivity or vision loss.

12.Keep your feet cold, not your face

Aim the a/c vents in your car at your feet, not at your eyes. Hot and cold dry air from car a/c units can rob your eyes of all moisture, leading to dry eye syndrome and an increased risk of eye infection.

13.Regular eye exams are a must

We know the typical question – “Why should I visit my eye clinic until I have a problem?” The answer is that many sight-threatening eye diseases don’t have symptoms until they’ve already damaged your vision permanently. A yearly routine eye exam is the only way to spot the signs of certain problems early on.

14.Don’t sleep in extended-wear contacts

Even though they’re called extended-wear, these contact lenses post a 10-15x greater risk of eye infection if you sleep in them. It’s best to remove them before bed.

Looking for more eye care tips? Head to your eye clinic to learn more about how to benefit from clear vision and healthy eyes.

Garden Grove Optometry, your Garden Grove eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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Garden Grove Eye Clinic – How to manage digital eye strain?

Garden Grove Optometry Tips on how to manage digital eye strain
in Garden Grove, California.

If you’re like most people, you’re probably inseparable from your electronic devices – phone, laptop, tablet, etc…, but wish you could part with the headaches and eye strain it’s causing.

On the average, American spend between 2 and 11 hours each day absorbing and processing digital media. This extended screen time can lead to a range of uncomfortable, or even painful visual symptoms. Most commonly, people complain to eye care professionals about dry eyes, blurry vision, headaches, eye twitching, red eyes, neck and shoulder pain. According to statistics reported by The Vision Council, 59% of people who use digital tech regularly experience these symptoms.

Topics: Digital eye strain, Digital eye strain glasses, Digital eye strain symptoms, How long does digital eye strain last

Getting to the root of the problem

What’s really causing digital eye strain? Several reasons are to blame. According to the American Physical Therapy Association, a main problem is the posture we use when starting at a digital screen. When using a mobile device, you probably view downwards, straining your neck. In fact, a 30-degree tilt of the head is said to create a 40 lb. strain on your neck!

At our eye clinic, we also treat many patients who have dry eyes from viewing screens all the time. That’s because people tend to blink less frequently when gazing at a digital device. Blinking is a vital reflex that keeps your eye surface lubricated with fresh, healthy tears. Every time you close and open your eyes, it clears environmental allergens and impurities from your eyes. When using a computer, studies show that you blink a third less times per minute. Consequently, your tear film is decreased – leading to burning, gritty feeling in your eyes, and blurred vision. Over time, reduced blinking may also damage the tear-producing glands in your eyes.

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Garden Grove eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

Why is blue light bad?

Blue light is a hot topic nowadays, and many of our eye care patients want to know the bottom line about this high-energy short wavelength.

First of all, the sun emits about 100 times more blue light than your phone. However, the sun is millions of miles away from your eyes, while your phone is only inches only. The blue light from your phone can therefore have a powerful effect. One critical way in which blue light affects your health is by disturbing your sleep cycle. When your eyes react to blue light (interpreted as sunny daylight), they send signals to your brain that it’s time to be awake. So using your smartphone in bed can seriously disrupt your body’s daily/nightly rhythm. Overexposure to blue light has also been associated with speeding up the aging process of your eye.

Tips to reduce eye strain

  • Before you do anything else, call an eye clinic near you to schedule an eye exam! Comprehensive eye exams are the best way to pinpoint any risk factors for digital eye strain, such as dry eye or an incorrect vision prescription for your glasses or contact lenses.
  • Adjust your work area. Make sure you are physically comfortable, sitting with good posture – not tilting your head or hunching over to look down at a laptop or tablet for long periods of time. The opposite can also be a problem – make sure your screen isn’t too high. The top of your screen should be at eye level with your head, allowing your eyes to look downward slightly towards the middle of the screen.
  • Check your lighting. Brighter light can help prevent or reduce eye strain. Light fixtures should also be angled in a way that doesn’t cast glare on your screen or shine into your eyes. Ambient lighting that matches the brightness of your screen causes the least amount of stress on your eyes.
  • Take a break every 20 minutes to look about 20 feet into the distance for 20 seconds – and blink as you do this! You’ll reset your eyes’ focus and disperse tears across the surface of your eyes. Getting up and taking a short walk can also be beneficial for preventing headaches.
  • Declare the two hours before bedtime as a no-screen zone. Listen to music, read a book, take a bath, or engage in any bedtime routine that doesn’t depend on a screen.

Still suffering from digital eyestrain?

Visit an eye care center for an eye exam and a consultation about more ways we can help to relieve your painful vision, such as computer glasses, blue-light blocking filters, and no-glare coatings on lenses.

Garden Grove Optometry, your Garden Grove eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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Garden Grove Eye Clinic – Does Diabetes Put You at Risk for Losing Your Sight?

Garden Grove Optometry Our eye doctor in Garden Grove, California explains.

Topics: Diabetes, Pre-diabetes, Diabetes symptoms, Symptoms of diabetes

If you have diabetes, you’ve probably been told about how you’re at risk for a range of serious health complications. Out of all these threatening problems, blindness may be the most feared.

Diabetic eye disease can develop as early as one year after the onset of diabetes, and statistics report that up to 45% of people with diabetes display some degree of damage to their retina. No matter which type of diabetes you have – type 1, type 2, insulin-dependent or not – the risk for eye disease is higher, and it’s increased by the number of years that you have diabetes. Also, African Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, and American Indians/Alaska Natives have a higher chance of losing vision from diabetes.

However, as our eye doctor reminds every patient with diabetes, vision loss is not inevitable! You can lower your chances of diabetic eye disease by taking several important actions.

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Garden Grove eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

Link Between Diabetes and Eyes

When blood sugar levels aren’t stable and maintained within the normal parameters (as recommended by your physician), it can weaken the blood vessels at the back of the eye. These abnormal retinal blood vessels can start to bleed and leak, blurring vision and impairing sight permanently. This condition is known as diabetic retinopathy, and it’s the most common eye problem caused by diabetes. During a diabetes eye exam at our eye clinic, we will inspect your eyes thoroughly for any signs of this dangerous condition.

In addition to retinopathy, people with diabetes are also at a greater risk of cataracts and glaucoma. Both of these eye diseases can blur vision, and glaucoma can damage the optic nerve – causing permanent loss of peripheral vision that can progress to complete blindness when left untreated.

You won’t be able to see diabetic eye disease until it’s too late! You may be surprised to learn that just because you don’t have any symptoms or visual complaints, it doesn’t mean your eyes are healthy. Most of the time, retinopathy doesn’t cause any symptoms until it has advanced to a point where the vision loss is irreversible. That’s why it’s so important to visit an eye care center for regular comprehensive eye exams! At these eye exams, your eye doctor will dilate your eyes to get a detailed view of the retina and optic nerve.

If you do notice symptoms, such as the sudden appearance of many floating spots (similar to spider webs), a “veil” covering your vision, or vision changes in one or both eyes, call your eye clinic immediately.

Diabetes-related Vision Loss Can Be Preventable

When retinopathy and other diabetic eye diseases are detected during their early stages, treatment can be highly effective and prevent permanent damage to your eyes. Early intervention is critical for the lasting health of your vision. If you have diabetes, the importance of visiting your eye clinic for yearly dilated eye exams cannot be overstated!

Additionally, good blood sugar control and healthy blood pressure go far towards protecting your eyes. That means following your physician’s instructions for how to care for your diabetes, be it through medication to keep blood sugars stable, exercising, eating nutritiously, losing weight, and making healthy lifestyle changes.

Treatment Can Save Sight

Various treatments are available for retinopathy. If the results of your eye exam show any problematic blood vessels, your eye doctor will discuss treatment options with you. Possible therapies given at your eye care center include injections of medication to decrease blood vessel leakage and inhibit the growth of abnormal blood vessels. This will stop the progression of diabetic eye disease. Laser surgery is another option, which may be performed at your eye clinic or local hospital. Treatment for diabetic eye disease can not only stabilize vision, but can sometimes even improve the quality of sight.

Make Visits to Your Eye Doctor a Part of Your Diabetes Care

If you have diabetes, annual eye exams at a qualified eye care center are essential for reducing your risks of eye disease!

Garden Grove Optometry, your Garden Grove eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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Garden Grove Eye Clinic – Prevent damage from Blue Light?

Garden Grove Optometry Real Tips from Your Garden Grove, California Eye Doctor

Summary:

Everywhere you look, there’s an article or blog telling you all about hazardous blue light. However, after years of experience as an optometrist in Garden Grove, I’d like to point out that blue light isn’t the root of all evil. Your computer, phone, tablet, and every digital screen you own pose additional dangers to your vision and your sleep – beyond the dangers of blue light.

Topics: Eye exam Garden Grove, California, Eye care services Garden Grove, California, Eye Doctor Garden Grove, California, Dry eye treatment Garden Grove, California

Is Blue Light the Big and Bad Enemy?

Blue light is a short, high-energy wavelength emitted in large amounts by all electronic devices. It can pass through the eye to the retina, and laboratory studies have shown how prolonged exposure to blue light damages the retinal cells in mice. That’s one fundamental reason behind the plentiful warnings to avoid blue light. However, the results of studies on real people (not rodents) didn’t attribute blue light with the same level of risk; other risk factors can be just as threatening to human vision.

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Garden Grove eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

Eyes Block Blue Light Naturally

Although it’s true that digital tech emits a huge quantity of blue light, you may not know that the sun also shines mainly with blue light. In fact, on a sunny day, the light coming at you is nearly 100,000 brighter than your computer screen. Yet, few scientific studies on humans have uncovered any connection between sunlight exposure and the development of a retinal disease, such as age-related macular degeneration.

Then how did the studies show that blue light damages mice eyes? Because mice and people don’t have the same eyes. Humans have built-in protective elements – macular pigments and the natural filter of our crystalline lens – that protect against blue light. These parts of your eyes absorb the blue light before it reaches the retina at the back of your eye.

Of course, that doesn’t mean sunglasses are unnecessary. By blocking all UVA and UVB rays from your eyes, sunglasses provide many more benefits than just blocking blue light. For example, research has shown that sunglasses slow down the development of other eye diseases, such as cataracts.

Digital Devices Are Still Dangerous

Even though blue light may not be the ultimate threat posed by electronic gadgets, that doesn’t mean blue light has zero negative effects on your eyes or that your digital screens are harmless. Blue light has a powerful, adverse effect on your sleep physiology. That’s because you have photosensitive retinal ganglion cells that convey the time of day to your brain, based on how light it is in the environment. These ganglion cells, which are hypersensitive to blue light, help to set your internal clock to keep you awake and alert during the day. Therefore, when you stare at a digital screen and its blue light, your ganglion cells tell your brain it’s still daylight – even at 2 am.

What if you put a blue-light blocking filter on your tablet whenever you use it in bed? Sorry, no dice. Your retinal cells are also sensitive to light waves other than blue, so filtering out blue light won’t improve your sleep. Really, you need to dim all the colors, all the different wavelengths of light.

How to Relieve Tired Eyes and Promote Sleep

When my Garden Grove eye clinic patients complain that their eyes are tired and they can’t sleep after looking at a screen from dawn through bedtime, I advise them to dim all screens starting from the evening hours. Bright light before bed (even from your phone screen) makes it harder to fall asleep. Even better, accept the challenge of making your bedroom a screen-free zone.

If you suffer from eye strain, it’s a good idea to call your Garden Grove eye doctor and schedule an eye exam. It’s possible that you need a new vision prescription for glasses or contact lenses.

Last, but not least, keep your eyes lubricated! One of the best ways to do that is to blink frequently enough. When you stare at a screen, you’re probably blinking at a slower rate than normal. Consequently, your tear film evaporates and doesn’t get replenished until you walk away from your computer and begin to blink regularly again. In addition to blinking, using preservative-free artificial tears eye drops before you sit down at the computer can help boost your natural tears and keep your eye surface better lubricated.

For more tips on how to keep screens from causing uncomfortable symptoms or damaging your sight, visit your friendly Garden Grove optometrist – I’m always happy to share helpful advice!

Garden Grove Optometry, your Garden Grove eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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Garden Grove Eye Clinic – What Causes Glaucoma?

Garden Grove Optometry Our eye doctor in Garden Grove, California explains

Summery: Glaucoma is an eye disease that involves an abnormal increase in your intraocular pressure (the fluid inside your eye). As the pressure rises, it damages your optic nerve. Because the optic nerve is responsible for transmitting images to your brain, this damage affects vision. When glaucoma is left untreated, the damage continues – leading to vision loss and blindness.

Topics: Glaucoma treatment Garden Grove, Eye Exam Garden Grove

What causes this sight-threatening condition?

Normally, your intraocular fluid (aqueous humor) flows out of the eye through a special channel – called the trabecular meshwork. When this channel gets blocked, the fluid can’t drain properly and pressure builds.

Most of the time, glaucoma is inherited and occurs in older adults, above age 60. Less commonly, glaucoma can be caused by severe eye infections, a chemical or blunt injury to your eye, inflammatory conditions, or a blockage of the blood vessels in your eye. Usually, both eyes are affected, but they may not be in exactly the same condition.

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Garden Grove eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

How is glaucoma detected?

Glaucoma doesn’t usually present early symptoms or pain. So the only way to know if you have it at an early stage is by visiting your Garden Grove eye clinic for a comprehensive eye exam. Eye doctors recommend getting a complete eye exam yearly if you are older than 40 or if you have a history of glaucoma (or any eye disease, for that matter) in your family. If the signs of glaucoma are detected, you can begin glaucoma treatment in Garden Grove – as soon as possible, which is the best way to protect your eyes and prevent vision loss!

Are there different types of glaucoma?

There are two types of glaucoma:Open-angle glaucoma (also called wide-angle glaucoma), is the most common form of this eye disease. Even though the drainage structure in your eye looks good, the intraocular fluid doesn’t flow out efficiently.

Angle-closure glaucoma (also called acute or narrow-angle glaucoma), occurs when the drain space between the iris and cornea becomes too narrow to facilitate proper drainage. Consequently, pressure rises suddenly in the eye.

Who gets glaucoma?

Risk factors for glaucoma include:

    • Over age 40
    • A family history of glaucoma
    • Asian, African, or Hispanic heritage
    • High eye pressure
    • Farsightedness or nearsightedness
    • Having had an eye injury
    • Using long-term steroid medications
    • Corneas that are thin in the center
    • Thinning of the optic nerve
    • Diabetes
    • High blood pressure
    • Migraines
    • Poor blood circulation

    What are the symptoms of glaucoma?

    The earliest symptoms of glaucoma can include a loss of peripheral vision, but usually people don’t notice any symptoms at all until late in the disease. That’s why glaucoma has been nicknamed the “sneak thief of sight.” If you want to make sure you don’t have glaucoma, book an eye exam at our Garden Grove eye clinic.

    Occasionally, pressure can build up in your eye to an extreme level, leading to headaches, blurred vision, eye pain, or seeing halos around lights. If you experience the following glaucoma symptoms, seek immediate medical assistance:

      • An eye that appears hazy
      • Eye pain
      • Vision loss
      • Seeing halos around lights
      • Redness in the eye
      • Narrowed vision (tunnel vision)
      • Nausea or vomiting, accompanied by the listed eye symptoms

      What glaucoma treatment is provided in Garden Grove?

      Glaucoma treatment by our Garden Grove eye doctor may involve eye drops that reduce fluid pressure, laser surgery, or microsurgery. The goal of all of these treatments is to lower intraocular pressure in the eye. Laser surgeries accomplish this in several different ways – either by making a tiny hole in the iris to let the fluid flow more smoothly, treating areas of the eye to reduce fluid production, or opening the drainage area. Microsurgery creates a new channel for drainage.

      Is there a way to prevent glaucoma?

      Presently, there are no proven methods to prevent glaucoma. But if the disease is diagnosed early, we offer progressive glaucoma treatment in Garden Grove, to protect your sight. Once vision is lost, it cannot be restored – but regular eye exams in our Garden Grove eye clinic can detect the early signs of glaucoma, preventing damage to your vision before it’s too late!

      Garden Grove Optometry, your Garden Grove eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

      Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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      Garden Grove Contact Lenses- Overuse of Contact Lenses – What Happens? How Can You Prevent It?

      Garden Grove Optometry Tips from our eye clinic on how to keep your eyes healthy with contact lenses

      Contact lenses can be a fantastic way to see crisp and clear without bothersome eyeglasses. They give a wider field of view and healthy, comfortable vision – as long as you don’t overuse them!

      Nowadays, with so many quality contact lenses on the market that provide exceptional visual clarity and convenience, it’s easy to abuse their use. However, this practice poses serious risks to your eyes. To avoid damaging your vision, our eye clinic shares the following information about avoiding the overuse of contact lenses.

      Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Garden Grove eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

      How much use is overuse?

      You should be removing your contact lenses for a minimum of 18 awake hours per week, giving your eyes time to rest and get sufficient oxygen. Your eyes need to absorb oxygen from the air (not from your lungs, like other organs), so allowing your eyes time to breathe without contact lenses in the way is essential.

      Don’t leave home without eyeglasses

      If you insert your contacts in the morning and will be out into the wee hours of the night, pack along a pair of glasses to switch to later in the day. This will help prevent eye strain and, ocular irritation.

      Don’t sleep in contact lenses

      Keeping your contacts in while dozing will damage your eyes, depriving them of oxygen and hydration. Without enough moisture, your contact lenses can dry out and lead to problems, such as corneal scratches.

      Replace your contact lenses on time

      Because modern contact lenses are made from advanced materials, they offer supreme comfort. That’s why so many people end up wearing them longer than prescribed – until they become uncomfortable. However, this is a risky practice that can lead to vision damage. When used for too long, contacts can develop tiny tears and accumulate calcium or protein deposits that can seriously irritate or injure your eyes. When you buy contacts from our eye clinic, we’ll provide you with instructions on how long each pair lasts and when to replace them.

      What happens from the overuse of contacts?

      There are three main problems that can result:

      • Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis (GPC): wearing your contact lenses for too long without changing them can lead to deposits in the lenses that cause Papillae (large granules that rub against the cornea) to form under the eyelids. As a result, you can experience itching, red eyes, light sensitivity, and the constant feeling that something is stuck in your eye.
      • Corneal ulcer: this is a serious infection that occurs on the outer layer of the eye and can damage vision. Wearing contact lenses while swimming can allow dangerous microbes to enter your eye. When these microbes stick to contacts, it increases your risk of corneal ulcers. Symptoms include redness, blurred vision, eye pain, and watering. Corneal ulcers require prompt medical treatment to prevent irreversible vision loss.
      • CLARE – Contact Lens Associated Red Eye: this sudden redness in your eye is typically caused by wearing contact lenses during bedtime. Insufficient oxygen to your cornea (because of tight-fitting contacts) is the culprit. It is a relatively mild problem, but you’ll need an eye exam at our eye clinic to determine whether you’re suffering from CLARE or an infection.

      When you visit our eye clinic for a contact lens eye exam or fitting, we’ll be happy to provide you with instructions on the proper way to use your contacts – and not overuse them!

      Garden Grove Optometry, your Garden Grove eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

      Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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      Garden Grove Eye Clinic- Eye Stroke – How is it similar to a stroke? What are the risks?

      Garden Grove Optometry Our eye doctor in Garden Grove, California explains

      High blood pressure and other heart diseases put your overall health at risk. That’s a health fact that you probably know. But did you ever think about how high blood pressure affects the delicate tissues of your eye?

      Hypertension can damage the arteries in your eye, leading to vision loss. When one or more damaged arteries have a blockage (due either to a clot or a build-up of cholesterol), eye stroke occurs. Eye stroke refers to when there is inadequate blood flow to the eye, and it can cause sudden loss of vision. While the vision loss can be temporary, it will become permanent if you don’t seek urgent treatment from an eye care professional! Call an eye clinic near you to book an emergency eye exam.

      Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Garden Grove eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

      Types of eye stroke

      Retinal vein occlusion (RVO): this is the most common type of eye stroke; it involves decreased blood flow in a vein that carries blood away from the eye. As a result, the blood vessels connected closely to that vein become backed up. Retinal arterial occlusion (RAO): this is not as common as RVO, yet it can be more serious; it is caused by a direct blockage of blood flowing into the eye, and it can be a strong indicator for a brain stroke. Ischemic optic neuropathy (ION): this obstruction of blood flow to the optic nerve is associated with giant cell arteritis, a condition that involves damaged or swollen temporal arteries in the brain. If left untreated, permanent vision loss can result. Non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION): this is associated with a disruption of healthy blood flow to the optic nerve and is similar to ION.

      Symptoms of eye stroke

      While eye stroke is generally painless, it is still a dangerous sight-threatening condition! Usually, the primary symptom is vision loss, which is temporary and happens in just one eye. However, vision damage can become irreversible if you don’t seek treatment quickly from a qualified eye doctor.

      Other possible symptoms include:

        • A sudden or gradual change in vision (such as seeing gray or black in one eye), even if it improves within a few minutes
        • New floaters
        • Blurry, distorted vision.
        • Sensation of discomfort or pressure in the eye

        Risk factors for eye stroke

          • Being male
          • Age – eye stroke happens most commonly in people in their 60s
          • High blood pressure
          • High cholesterol
          • Diabetes
          • Narrowing of the carotid or neck artery

          Diagnosis by your eye doctor

          An eye stroke is diagnosed by reviewing your medical history, including any pre-existing health conditions (such as hypertension and diabetes), and performing a dilated eye exam. Your visual field and central visual acuity will be assessed, and your optic nerve and retina will be inspected. Advanced optometric imaging equipment may also be used to take pictures of your inner eye structure to check the blood flow in your eye.

          Treatment of eye stroke

          If the source of the blockage is a blood clot, you may be prescribed blood-thinning medication to dissolve the clot. Lowering pressure in the eye can also prompt the clot to flow out of the eye. To do this, your eye doctor may insert a needle into your eye and withdraw fluid. Another in-office treatment to reduce pressure in your eye can involve having you breathe into a paper bag to increase the level of carbon dioxide in your blood.

          The difference between eye stroke and brain stroke

          The main similarity between eye strokes and brain strokes is that typically, they are both caused by reduced blood flow. The risk factors for both problems are also similar, such as cardiovascular disease, age, and hypertension. However, brain strokes can also occur due to rupture and bleeding from an artery.

          Keep in mind that the blood circulation to the retina is the same circulation that flows to the front of the brain, so eye strokes and brain strokes are connected in that way. Also, eye strokes are a significant risk factor for experiencing a brain stroke.

          Symptoms of eye stroke? Visit your eye doctor for emergency eye care

          Even if your symptoms clear up quickly and your vision returns to normal, it’s critical to visit an eye care professional as soon as possible. It only takes a few minutes for eye strokes to cause permanent damage. Also, a comprehensive eye exam can reveal that you are at risk of having a stroke in the brain. Therefore, a visit to a nearby eye clinic can help prevent the debilitating trauma of brain stroke.

          Garden Grove Optometry, your Garden Grove eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

          Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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