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Help! My Child Doesn’t Want to Wear Glasses!

Do your kids need glasses in order to see clearly? Maybe they have a strong case of nearsightedness, perhaps they have astigmatism, or another type of refractive error. Whatever the cause, getting your kids to wear eyeglasses can be a parenting challenge.

Dr. Ann Inman treats patients from all over Garden Grove, California with their vision correction needs. The knowledgeable, caring staff at Garden Grove Optometry can help you and your kids if they’re struggling with their glasses or don’t want to wear them.

Why Won’t My Child Wear His or Her Glasses?

To help your children get the best vision possible, you first need to understand why they’re fighting with you over their glasses. It usually stems from something physical, emotional, or social, such as:

  • Wrong fit
  • Wrong prescription
  • Personal style
  • Reactions from friends

How do you know which it is? Pay close attention to the signs, from what your kids say, to how they behave, to how they interact with others.

Physical

Improper fit is a big reason why glasses could feel uncomfortable. If they slip down, itch behind the ears, or put pressure on the bridge of the nose, it can explain why a child wouldn’t like to wear them.

If there’s been a big change to their prescription, they may need time to get used to it. If they were given the wrong prescription, they may be straining their eyes, getting headaches, or having eye fatigue. An incorrect prescription can make wearing glasses painful or awkward. It doesn’t correct their vision, either, so they’ll still see blurry images. When this happens, your eye doctor can check the prescription and make an adjustment.

Emotional

Your kids at home aren’t the same as your kids in school, on the sports field, or with their friends. They may be afraid of being made fun of in school, or they may not want the sudden attention on their appearance. These feelings can be even stronger among the tween and teen set.

Social

Even young kids can feel different when they put on a pair of glasses, especially if it’s for the first time. Feeling different or weird, in their eyes, translates to a negative experience. When wearing glasses makes them feel like the odd man out, they may not want to wear them. The last thing your child wants is to feel like a social outcast. After all, everyone wants to belong.

How We Can Help

First, bring your child in to the eye doctor for an eye exam. Our optometrist, Dr. Ann Inman, will check to make sure that your child has the right prescription and that any vision problems are being corrected. Next, we’ll take a look at the glasses and place them on your child’s face to determine if they’ve got the proper fit. Our optician will take care of any adjustments that need to be made.

The Vision They Need, The Style They Want

Fashion isn’t only for adults. Your budding fashionista or trendy young stud wants to look awesome, so don’t forget about style. When your kids look great, they’ll feel great! Give them the top-quality eyewear they need without compromising on style. Your kids are a lot more likely to wear glasses when they like the way they look.

What You Can Do to Help

Encourage, stay positive, and don’t give up. Avoid telling them what you want them to wear. Let them choose for themselves. In the end, they’re the ones wearing the glasses. Making decisions is an important life skill, something they’ll need as they grow up and become more independent.

For younger children, use positive words to encourage them. Talk about how glasses are like magic, letting them see beautiful things around them. Show them how a pretty flower or a bright red truck looks with the glasses on, and how different it looks with the glasses off. For older kids, throw in a little pop culture. Tell them how trendy they’ll look by showing them pictures of celebrities who also wear glasses. You’ll also rack up some cool parent points.

At Garden Grove Optometry, we have the experience and unique approach to children’s eyewear that will make your kids want to wear their glasses. Schedule an eye exam today – you can book an appointment online right here. If you have any questions or concerns, give us a call and we’ll be glad to help.

A Vision of Back-To-School

A child back to school, Optometrist Garden Grove, CA

The new school year is coming up fast, and parents and students are getting ready to embark on new adventures and experiences. But this is also a reminder to parents that good eyesight is possibly the most important school supply your child may not have. A good education for children doesn't just mean good schools, good teachers and good friends. Good vision is just as important. Dr. Ann Inman of Garden Grove Optometry in Garden Grove, California explains, “Your child’s eyes are his/her gateway into the world of learning. When your child’s vision is not functioning properly, learning and participation in recreational activities will suffer. Children are not likely to recognize vision problems or report them, and it is, therefore, the responsibility of parents and teachers to recognize signs of visual problems in their children.”

There is a basic set of vision skills that are needed for school. The first is near vision. This is the ability to see clearly at a distance of about 10-13 inches. This is obviously important for reading, writing and close work at your child’s desk. Distance vision, the ability to see clearly and comfortably beyond arm’s reach, is also important in order to see the board in the classroom, and binocular coordination, or the ability to use both eyes together, is important for extra-curricular activities. Both are vision skills needed to be successful in school. Additionally, focusing skills, peripheral awareness, and eye-hand coordination are also important. As a parent, it is your job to be alert for symptoms that may indicate your child has a vision or visual processing problem. A few examples of common conditions that may affect your child's ability to learn are below:

If your child gets headaches while trying to read or do other close work, exhibits a short attention span during visual tasks, and/or has to use a finger to guide reading, it is possible your child may have a condition called convergence insufficiency. This is a condition in which the eyes have a hard time converging on a certain point close up. This may also cause the words to “jump” or “blur” when your child attempts to read.

You may also find that your child's eyes do not seem to move together, that the eyes do not face the same direction, and/or that your child tilts his/her head or squints in order to see better. This could indicate a condition called Strabismus. This results from muscles in one or both eyes being misaligned or underdeveloped. This can cause severe difficulty for your child and may cause more significant problems, including loss of depth perception, if not treated promptly. Dr. Ann Inman adds, “Other symptoms to look out for that may signal vision-related problems are difficulty remembering or identifying shapes, difficulty remembering what was read, excessive blinking or rubbing of his/her eyes, or placing his/her head very close to the book or desk when reading or writing”.

Because changes in your child’s vision can occur without you or your child noticing them, your child should visit the eye doctor every year or more frequently if specific problems or risk factors exist. Remember, school vision or pediatrician’s screenings are good, but they are not a substitute for a thorough eye exam.

To learn more, contact Dr. Ann Inman today.

Eye Condition Treatment

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Eye problems can range from mild to severe; some are chronic, while others may resolve on their own, never to appear again. The articles below will give you a basic understanding of some of these problems and their implications. The cardinal rule is if your eyes don't look good, feel good or see well, you should visit your doctor.

The following is a short list of common eye conditions we treat, such as astigmatism, dry eye syndrome and presbyopia. For information about cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy please see Eye Disease Management.

Emergency Eye Care Services

Treatment for Eye Injuries and Infections in Garden Grove

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Garden Grove Optometry offers emergency services. Dr. Inman and Dr. Gaylord offer emergency services that require immediate and urgent eye care. If your eye is injured, don’t try to judge the severity of it. Immediately seek the opinion of an eye doctor to lessen the risk of hurting your vision. We understand ocular emergencies can arise at any time.

Please call our Garden Grove, CA office: 714-500-7577 for further instructions.

 

Call Us! 714-500-7577

 

Symptoms that require emergency service include, but are not limited to:

  • Sudden loss of vision
  • Sudden double vision
  • Sudden red/painful eye
  • Pink Eye
  • New onset flashes and/or floaters
  • Foreign body in the eye (especially metal or chemicals)

Things NOT to do while waiting for professional medical assistance:

  • DO NOT press on an injured eye or allow the victim to rub the eye(s).
  • DO NOT attempt to remove a foreign body that is resting on the cornea (the clear surface of the eye through which we see) or that appears to be embedded in any part of the eye.
  • DO NOT use dry cotton (including cotton swabs) or sharp instruments (such as tweezers) on the eye.
  • DO NOT attempt to remove an embedded object.

DO call our office at 714-500-7577 for further instructions! We are here for you!

Dr. Inman Answers YOUR Eye Emergency Questions

Foreign Body Removal

I have sand stuck in my eye, is it dangerous?

Any kind of foreign material in your eye can be dangerous. Usually, sand can be flushed out of the eye with water or saline. However, it can often scratch your cornea so you should see your optometrist if it feels irritated.

I have something stuck in my eye, how should I remove it?

You should never try to remove anything that is actually stuck in your eye. If it can’t be flushed out with water or saline, you need to see your local eye doctor. Trying to remove a foreign object yourself will usually just embed it further. If something has pierced your eye such as a coat hanger of a piece of metal, you will need to go to an emergency room immediately.

I feel like I have dirt in my eye when I wear contact lenses, is that dangerous?

Contact lenses can cause a foreign body sensation or the feeling like you have dirt in your eyes for different reasons. It could just be that your eyes are getting too dry but, you may also be getting a keratitis (a corneal infection) or lenses are dirty or old. It’s best not to wear your contact lenses until you can be evaluated by your optometrist.

I spilled a chemical in my eye, what should I do?

If any kind of chemical liquid or spray gets in your eye, flush it immediately with cold water for 5-10 minutes and go to see your optometrist immediately.  Toddlers, young children, and people who work with chemicals are especially at risk of getting damaging chemical burns and need to be treated immediately

I spilled some chemical in my eye, should I remove my contacts or leave them in?

Whenever you get a chemical in your eye, you should immediately flush your eye with water or saline and remove and throw out your contacts lenses. Your contact lenses will absorb chemicals and it is impossible to thoroughly clean them. If your eye feels okay, it is generally recommended that you wait at least 24 hours before trying to re-apply contact lenses. And, remember, goggles should always be worn when using chemicals that may splash into your eye.

Scratches

My child scratched my eye...what should I do?

If you feel pain or a feeling like something is in your eye, you should visit your local eye doctor to take a look at it immediately to determine the best treatment. If you're in the Garden Grove area, you can call our eye clinic for fast treatment. If you happen to have artificial teardrops, you can use those in the eye every 20 minutes or so until you get to our office.

Is a scratch on the eye dangerous?

A scratch on your cornea (the outer clear part of the eye that covers the colored iris part) can be dangerous because it may become infected and can lead to scarring which may cause reduced vision or blindness. This type of injury can also lead to another condition called “recurrent erosions” where the cornea has continued episodes of pain, light sensitivity, watering and possible scarring that become a chronic or lifetime problem.

Trauma

I got hit in the eye with a baseball, is that dangerous for my vision?

Yes, being hit in the eye with any kind of object can be dangerous and you should seek the care of your local eye doctor immediately.

Should I visit an eye doctor if I got a black eye?

Yes, a black eye needs to be properly evaluated to rule out things like a corneal abrasion, inflammation inside of the eye, and possible damage to the back part of your eye, the retina. An eye exam is strongly recommended.

I have pain in my eye after getting a black eye, should I visit the emergency room or an eye doctor?

At Garden Grove Optometry, we recommend that you see an eye doctor. Your optometrist has the unique equipment and expertise in dealing with injuries to the eye that the emergency room does not have. In fact, for eye emergencies that do not require immediate surgery, most emergency rooms will refer you back to an optometrist anyway.

Kids

My toddler is complaining that his eye hurts, should I make an appointment with the optometrist?

Yes, children often have trouble voicing or understanding what is going on with their eyes and vision. It is always worth an exam by your optometrist to see what’s going on. Furthermore, most eye problems would not be visible to the parent, so there may be a tendency to ignore a child’s complaint since they are not experiencing it themselves.

My child came home from school saying that his eye hurts, what should I do?

Try to figure out it which eye it is and when it started. Was it related to any certain activity? Does it feel any better or worse since it started? Try not to put words in their mouths and remain calm when asking these questions to your child so they don’t panic and can answer your questions more accurately. Then, take this information with you to see your optometrist.

My child’s eye looks very red, what should I do?

Red eyes can mean very many different things and can present in many different degrees of severity. A pinkish tint to an eye that occurs right after swimming, may just need some artificial tears or lubricating drops. However, if this condition continues to be a problem or gets worse, it could be more serious and needs to be attended to.  A very red eye, especially with any mucous or watery discharge needs to be seen to immediately. Also, any kind of pink or red eye that has an unknown cause should be looked at by your optometrist.

My child has a weird bump in his eye, should I make an appointment?

There are a lot of different kinds of bumps on children’s eyes. The most common ones are on the lids and may be called “styes” or “chalazions” It is extremely important that these are treated properly and immediately for the best outcome. It is worth a visit to your Garden Grove optometrist to make sure this is the correct diagnosis and to determine the best treatment.

Severe Emergencies

I just lost my vision in one eye, what should I do?

A complete and sudden loss of vision in one eye is a serious eye emergency and needs medical attention immediately.  It is best to call your eye doctor’s office and discuss your symptoms.

My eye is bleeding what should I do?

If the eye is bleeding due to an injury, it needs to be treated immediately. If it is just a little red spot on the white part of your eye (the sclera) you can see the eye doctor the next day.

I am seeing double, should I go to the eye doctor?

Double vision has many different meanings to people. Often people will say they are having double vision when they really mean “blurred” vision, not actually two images of a single object. You should note when this first occurred and if it is constant or intermittent. One of the most helpful things to do is figure out if its double with the right eye, left eye or both? You can do this by simply covering one eye with your hand, note the effect, and repeat with the other eye.  This can be very useful in figuring out the possible causes and how urgent the patient needs to be seen. Regardless, make an appointment ASAP with your local Garden Grove eye doctor.

All SUDDEN loss of vision, or double vision (diplopia), needs immediate attention and the advice of your eye doctor or physician.

I have severe pain in my eye, what do I do?

Severe eye pain is an emergency and needs to be seen by your local eye doctor immediately.

I feel a lot of pressure behind my eye, what should I do?

Pressure, vs pain, can be caused by a number of serious conditions. You should be evaluated by your eye doctor in Garden Grove (if you're in town) as soon as possible to assess the issue.

Click here to learn more about our Advanced Technology at Garden Grove Optometrist in CA

Also ask us about Lasik co-management at our Garden Grove eye care clinic.

Computer Vision Syndrome

How to Minimize Digital Strain on Your Eyes

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Workspace Alterations

Proper Lighting and Screen Brightness: Use fewer light fixtures or lower voltage light bulbs and close curtains or blinds when possible. Adjust the brightness and contrast of your monitor to the levels that are most comfortable.

Reduce Glare: Set up your computer where glare from windows won’t affect your screen or cover windows when this is not possible. An anti-glare screen on your monitor or an anti-reflective (AR) or anti-glare coating applied to your eyewear can also help to minimize glare and the strain it causes to your vision.

Screen size and distance: You want to make sure you are using a high quality (such as a flat LCD) screen that has a relatively large display. Your viewing distance should be about an arm’s length away with the top of the monitor at about eye level or slightly below.

Call 714-530-2020

Eye Care Tips to Minimize Digital Strain on Your Eyes

Computer Eyewear

computer eye glasses - Garden Grove Optometry in CA

Computer glasses reduce eye strain by adjusting the focus slightly so your eyes feel like they are focusing on something further away. They also have a tint to remove the glare and block blue light from entering into your eyes. There are a number of options for computer eyewear, both if you need prescription eyewear and not.

Keep Eyes Moist

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When viewing a digital screen or monitor for an extended period of time, we tend to blink less frequently. Blinking however, is critical for keeping the eyes moist, which allows them to remain clear and comfortable and to avoid dry eyes, irritation, blurry vision or eye fatigue.

Give Your Eyes a Break

blue light consultation - Garden Grove Optometry in CA

Schedule and take frequent breaks from your screen. Follow the 20-20-20 rule; every 20 minutes, look at something 20 feet away for 20 seconds. Take this time to stand up and stretch your back, neck and legs as well.

Adults & Kids Are Susceptible to Computer Eye Strain

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It is important to know that both adults and children alike are susceptible to computer eye strain from computers and digital devices. With the growing use of such devices in our everyday lives, it is important to start educating ourselves and our children on how to combat the negative effects of these habits.

Regular eye examinations and proper viewing habits can help to prevent or reduce the development of the symptoms associated with Computer Vision Syndrome.

Our Office Hours and Location

Located Right Next to Waterfront Cafe on Brookhurst St in Garden Grove, CA

Call 714-530-2020

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Cataract Surgery Co-Management

Cataracts is a disease of the eye that results in the clouding of the lens of the eyeball. Cataracts prevent clear images from appearing on the eye’s retina; causing mild, moderate, even severe blurred vision.

Typically an eye disorder associated with aging (over half of the people in America over age 80 have either had a cataract or cataract surgery), cataracts generally occur later in life as the lens structure within the human eye changes and gets older.

During the evaluation of your eye health we will carefully examine your lens for signs of cataract formation. If a cataract is noticed and the clouding is causing visual disruption, the optometrist will refer you to a trusted and respected surgeon for surgery, which is the only known cure for cataracts. Our Eye Care Practice will be there for you providing pre and post cataract surgery care.

Cataract Surgery

Cataract surgery is the removal of the natural lens of the eye (also called “crystalline lens”) that has developed an opacification, which is referred to as a cataract. Metabolic changes of the crystalline lens fibers over the time lead to the development of the cataract and loss of transparency, causing impairment or loss of vision. During cataract surgery, a patient’s cloudy natural lens is removed and replaced with a synthetic lens to restore the lens’s transparency.

Following surgical removal of the natural lens, an artificial intraocular lens implant is inserted (eye surgeons say that the lens is “implanted”). Cataract surgery is generally performed by an ophthalmologist (eye surgeon) in an ambulatory (rather than inpatient) setting, in a surgical center or hospital, using local anesthesia (either topical, peribulbar, or retrobulbar), usually causing little or no discomfort to the patient. Well over 90% of operations are successful in restoring useful vision, with a low complication rate. Day care, high volume, minimally invasive, small incision phacoemulsification with quick post-op recovery has become the standard of care in cataract surgery all over the world.

Learn More

cataracts iconThe more you know about cataracts, the better prepared you will be to deal with them – or help prevent them in the first place!

Scratch Resistant

There’s no such thing as scratch-proof lenses. (Even glass lenses can be scratched!) Scratches, while not likely to affect your lens performance, are an annoyance that can interfere with clear vision. That’s why you should always request scratch resistant lenses (treatment) for your eyeglass lenses.
Many of today’s lens products have hard scratch-resistant protection built into the lens—a hard surface treatment that is specifically designed to resist scratches. But it’s not an automatic feature! Be sure to discuss scratch resistant glasses options with your eye care professional.
We put our glasses through a lot from day to day—and our children, even more so. Scratch resistant lenses can go a long way toward minimizing the everyday wear and tear we put on our eyewear.

Lens care for scratch-resistant glasses

Don’t forget, no treatment can completely protect eyeglass lenses from scratches. But you can help out! Remember to keep your glasses in a cushioned, sturdy case when not wearing them. Clean them regularly with warm, soapy water and dry them with a clean, soft cloth. With scratches as with life, a little extra care goes a long, long way.

 

Special thanks to the EyeGlass Guide, for information material that aided in the creation of this website. Visit the EyeGlass Guide today!

Caring for Lenses

When it comes to prescription lens care, there’s a simple rule that, if followed, will virtually guarantee years of optimum performance from your glasses: If they’re not on your face, then keep your eyeglasses in a case.
Trouble is, no one really follows that simple rule, all of the time. (You know who you are.) If you, like so many of us, don’t always use a solid case to store your prescription glasses, then the following lens care and maintenance tips will go a long way toward maintaining your healthy sight.

Cleaning glasses and protecting your lenses

Keep it clean. Keep it simple. To wash your prescription eyeglass lenses, eye care professionals suggest you gently rub your lenses clean with your fingers using warm, soapy water. Rinse them, and then pat them dry with a clean, soft cloth. Many optical suppliers sell ultra-fine, machine-washable microfiber lens cleaning cloths that trap dirt and dust. Try to avoid rubbing prescription lenses with rags, facial tissues or paper towels, as they could scratch your lenses. And definitely avoid using household cleaners, acetone or soaps with cream—as chemicals may damage your frames.

A strong case for storage

Storing your lenses in a sturdy protective case whenever you are not wearing them will go a long way towards preventing scratches on your lenses. Proper storage also helps to keep prescription eyeglass lenses clean while protecting your valuable frames. Never place prescription glasses in a purse, pocket or bag unprotected.

Let them down gently

Okay. You don’t always use the case. If setting your prescription lenses on a table or desk, it’s best to close your frames first before laying them down. Always set them frame-side down to avoid scratching the lenses. The floor is never a good place to leave your glasses. And when in the bathroom, remember: A sink or vanity top puts your lenses in an unfavorable position. Spatters, sprays and cosmetic products can quickly soil lenses. What’s more, anti-reflective (AR) treatments can be damaged by hairsprays or perfume.
Keep glasses on your nose, not on your head. Prescription eyeglass lenses are designed to rest on your nose in front of your eyes; not on the top of your head. Frames can become misaligned in this manner, making even the cleanest of lenses less than effective if not positioned properly in front of the eye.

Special thanks to the EyeGlass Guide, for informational material that aided in the creation of this website. Visit the EyeGlass Guide today!

Lens Options for Eyeglasses

If you thought the trickiest part of choosing a new pair of glasses was the frame selection, think again. You should be putting just as much thought and consideration into the lenses that you select for your new specs.

Here’s why:
The quality and type of lenses in your eyeglasses will not only correct your visual acuity, but they will allow you to continue to see your best through various conditions. Whether it is keeping the lenses free from scratches, fog, glare or UV rays, or making them stronger or more attractive, your eyeglass lenses can help to keep your eyes safe and comfortable wherever the day (or night) takes you.

Lens Coatings

Here are a variety of coatings that you can apply to your lenses to maintain optimal vision and comfort and to protect your lenses and your eyes.

Anti-reflective/Anti-glare Coatings

Anti-reflective (AR) also known as anti-glare coatings help reduce the reflections and glare on your lenses, improving your vision and comfort in high-glare environments, and the look of your glasses as well (you can see your eyes clearly without a reflection on the front of the lens). Reflections from the sun, television and computer screens and bright lights (especially when driving at night) can cause eye strain, headaches and difficulty seeing. AR coatings and lenses can reduce this effect, improving your vision quality and comfort in these circumstances.

Scratch Resistant Coatings

Scratches not only affect the smooth look of the surface of your glasses but they can disrupt your vision. A scratch-resistant coating adds an extra layer of protection on the surface of the lens to significantly reduce scratching. This coating is particularly great for kids who may tend to be a little more rough with their eyewear.

Ultraviolet Coatings

Ultraviolet (UV) coatings protect your eyes from harmful UV rays from the sun. This coating can turn standard lenses into UV blocking lenses that can block 100% of the UV light from entering your eyes. UV is linked to the development of a number of eye diseases such as cataracts, macular degeneration and retinal damage.

Anti-fog Coatings

Particularly if you live in a cold climate, you may have experienced walking indoors from the cold and having your glasses lenses fog up completely. This can take a few minutes to resolve and can be dangerous if you are driving or need to see clearly. Anti-fog coatings will eliminate this effect, creating a smooth transition from cold to hot environments.

Lens Options

You may want to go with an upgraded lens to improve the look, strength or functionality of your glasses.

High Index Lenses

High index lenses have a higher refractive index which means they reflect more light than standard prescription lenses. What this means for you, the consumer, is that they can be made thinner and lighter than traditional lenses. High index lenses are particularly popular with those that need a high prescription as they are able to avoid thick lenses, adding comfort and a smoother look, but a higher price tag.

Trivex or Polycarbonate Lenses

Trivex or polycarbonate lenses are impact resistant lenses – a fantastic choice for sports and safety eyewear as well as standard sunglasses and eyeglasses for active types or kids. These lenses also offer full UV protection and are lightweight for optimal comfort.

Polychromatic Lenses

Polychromatic lenses are made with special technology that turns them into sunglasses when exposed to sunlight. The lenses darken automatically when you go outside and return to normal when you go back indoors. Polychromatic lenses can come in a number of tint colors and are great when you need prescription sunglasses but don’t want to carry around or pay for another pair.

Aspheric Lenses

Aspheric lenses use advanced technology to create a slimmer, flatter and lighter lens than standard prescription lenses. While aspheric lenses can improve the appearance of any prescription lens, they are especially beneficial for those who are farsighted since those lenses tend to bulge out in the middle.

So the next time you are in the market for new eyeglasses, speak to your optometrist or optician about the best lens choices for your eyes, your vision and your lifestyle.

Eyeglass Frames

Are you in the market or mood for a new pair of eyeglasses? The selection is vast, with many fashionable, attractive pairs of glasses to browse through. How can you narrow down your options and choose the style of frames that are best for you?

Questions to Ask Yourself When Choosing Eyewear

  1. What’s my taste? Do I prefer a bold or subtle expression? Do I favor modern lines, a retro look or more conservative, classic styles?
  2. Where do I plan to wear these frames- at work, in the backyard, or for social outings?
  3. What colors work best with my skin and hair tones?
  4. What are the primary colors in my wardrobe?
  5. What’s the shape of my face?
  6. Do I like my current eyeglasses? If not, then what’s the problem?

Bring this information to your optician when you pay a visit to the eyeglass store, and most of the work will already be done! Your optician, who is highly skilled and expert in fitting your eyewear will be able to hone in quickly on the eyeglasses that are most suitable.

How to Judge Fit and Comfort

Research conducted by the eyewear industry indicates that women pay more attention to how eyeglasses appear on their face, while men are more interested in how they feel and fit. Yet even if looks are your primary concern, if your eyeglasses aren’t comfortable – you won’t be pleased to put them on.

To judge the fit of frames when trying them on:

  • Frames should be wide enough for your face and not too snug on sides of your head. The edges of your eyeglasses should extend beyond the sides of your face. This ensures that the temples won’t press in on your head as they rest on your ears.
  • The curves at the end of each temple should go past your ear without pushing down on it. If they don’t, then the temples aren’t long enough.
  • The built-in nosepiece or silicone nose pads should fit comfortably and firmly, without pinching the bridge of your nose. Silicone nose pads can generally be adjusted.
  • Your glasses should be able to stay in place when you move your head to and fro. Nod a few times, turn your head right and left, and bend over to touch the floor. Make sure that your glasses don’t slip off.

Is One Pair of Eyeglasses Enough?

Take a look at your closet. You likely own more than one pair of shoes, right? Unless you’re on a very tight budget, more than one pair of eyeglasses isn’t a luxury. Eyewear is a hip accessory, and the same pair may not be appropriate for all parts of your modern lifestyle. Just like your clothing, your eyeglass needs differ for home, work and social occasions.

If owning a solitary pair is enough for you, then choose frames that you love and feel good about no matter what you’re wearing or where you go. These eyeglasses will be on your face daily and constantly, so take your time and pick a style that fits your unique personality and vision requirements.

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